Using the Draw Circuit Wirepath and Draw Shared Wirepath commands

Overview of this article

The Draw Circuit Wirepath and Draw Shared Wirepath commands are a powerful way of quickly drawing wirepaths between connected devices.

The commands also create linetypes with text defining the cable and wire used for the circuits.

The article is separated into four parts.

  • Part 1 - Distinguishing between the two commands.
  • Part 2 - Modifying/rerouting the automatically drawn wirepaths.
  • Part 3 - Combining multiple circuit types in one wirepath.
  • Part 4 - Setting the MSLTSCALE and the PSLTSCALE toggles.

 

Part 1 - Distinguishing between the two commands.

The drawing's model space below shows us that the devices have been connected to circuits. We will use the Draw Circuit Wirepath command. 

  • Part 1a - The Draw Circuit Wirepath command.

This command draws a wirepath which will only permit the circuit type required by the circuit it is connecting.

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The prompt asks whether to Delete or to Reuse, a question that refers to any existing wirepaths. Since there are no existing wirepaths we can choose either one.

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Wirepaths are drawn following the connected devices in the order they were connected to the circuits.

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Now let us use the Set Circuit Type Filters command to see which type of circuits are permitted in each wirepath.

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The wirepath for the circuit we selected before executing the Set Circuit Type Filters command will permit only selected types of circuits.

This limitation is because we used the Draw Circuit Wirepath command and not the Draw Shared Wirepath command.

Those specific circuit types are defined by the circuit type filters in that circuit's settings. (More on that topic in a separate article)

Note the checked boxes below showing the allowable types for the connected NAC circuit:

  • AUX POWER
  • JUNCTION PASSTHROUGH
  • NAC
  • NAC Trigger
  • SURGE PROTECTION

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  • Part 1b - Draw Shared Wirepath command.

To illustrate the difference between the Draw Circuit Wirepath  and the Draw Shared Wirepath commands, we will now choose the latter.

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We are asked the same Delete or Reuse question. If wirepaths have already been drawn, we must choose Delete in order to draw new ones.

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FireCAD automatically draws shared wirepaths.

Now we use the Set Circuit Type Filters command to see which type of circuits are permitted in each wirepath.

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The result is that each wirepath permits All circuit types.

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Part 2 - Modifying/rerouting the automatically drawn wirepaths.

We can see that our automatically drawn wirepaths put some lines where we do not want them, specifically showing circuits through the elevator banks.

To resolve that, we choose the Auto Poly (or any other draw command) to place wirepaths where we want them.

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We draw a new wirepath to replace the 1A path (the slc to the smoke detector).

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This next step is not necessary but it can enhance the clarity of the completed drawing.

We match properties, applying the linetype of the line going through the elevator shaft to the new line we drew.

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For the match properties command, we first select the source object (the original line)

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Then we select the destination object (the replacement line we drew where we want it to be located)

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Now we erase the original line.

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After deleting the automatically drawn NAC wirepaths, and using the ATPOLY command, we draw new lines through a similar path to route the NAC circuits.

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Now we choose the Draw Shared Wirepath command.

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This time, since we already have polylines to use as wirepaths, we choose REUSE. 

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The result of this command is to REUSE the lines we drew and use them as wirepaths assigned to the NAC circuits. Notice that the "1V" designation is applied to the polylines we drew and reused.

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Not only did FireCAD apply labels to the wirepaths, it did so intelligently. Following the circuit from the FACU, the wirepath contains 2 V cables, one for each of the NAC circuits.

 

At the point where NAC 1 and NAC 2 split, (the device N1 01), the labels change to showing 1 V cable (one for each NAC).

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If we wish, we can use match properties to override the layer and color settings for our newly-drawn lines.

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Or we can simply override the color of the line.

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Part 3 - Combining multiple circuit types in one wirepath.

FireCAD will permit us to combine more than one circuit type in a single wirepath. In the example below we have drawn the routing we desire using the ATPOLY command.

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The Update All Wire Labels command will cause FireCAD to search the circuit paths and to assign appropriate labels.

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The wirepath labels are now updated.

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Part 4 - Setting the MSLTSCALE and the PSLTSCALE toggles.

The AutoCAD setting MSLTSCALE must aways be set to 0 for the linetypes to display correctly in model space.

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If you change this setting, you must use a REGEN or a REGENALL command to insure their display.

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The same setting must be correct on the layout tabs. Below we have selected MODEL on a layout tab display.

On layout tab displays we must use the command PSLTSCALE. It must be set to 0 here.

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After setting to 0 use another REGEN or REGENALL command.

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Now our linetypes with wirepath labels are displayed.

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They remain that way even after we select PAPER in the layout display.

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